A Residence Blog

Travel and adventure taking, memory and home making, parenting and play shaking, never faking, tales of family life.

A Residence Blog

Travel and adventure taking, memory and home making, parenting and play shaking, never faking, tales of family life.

How to Cook an Ostrich Egg (and 8 reasons why you should)

Ostrich Eggs are great for Easter, Fondu, impressing kids, looking like Dinosaur eggs and feeding a big group! Click through to find out how to cook an Ostrich Egg

Over the summer my sister in law brought over an Ostrich egg from her local farm shop, it was a real source of fascination to all the family old and young. I recommend you try and buy one as they are fun, but also great to cook with with a lovely light taste and texture. Here’s how to cook an ostrich egg, and why you really should!

how to cook an ostrich egg

How to cook and Ostrich Egg

8 reasons why you should cook an ostrich egg and cooking ideas to try!

  1. Everyone will love guessing what kind of egg it is. Dinosaur? Albatros? Crocodile?
  2. If you have 50 minutes you could make the most gigantic boiled egg and have fun dipping soldiers in together.  Always plunge ostrich eggs in cold water after cooking as the shells retain a lot of heat and will continue to cook the egg!
  3. Be the envy of all at a dinner party and serve soft boiled ostrich egg fondue with giant crudites, of asparagus or toast. Worth a practice or two first though.
  4. If you have 90 minutes to 2 hours you could hard boil it and make a gigantic egg salad.
  5. For an unforgettable breakfast feast why not make giant fried egg?
  6. Having a big gathering? Why not scramble the egg for breakfast, much quicker than cracking lots of hen eggs.
  7. Rather like duck eggs are best for baking, in our experience light textured ostrich eggs turned out to be a much better texture for eggy bread, or French toast, than hen eggs. One egg easily made enough for our extended family.
  8. If you break into the egg carefully you can keep it and decorate it. The egg shells are really tough, like china, so carefully tap the top with a hammer and nail or with the corner of knife blade nearest to the handle until the opening is wide enough to pour the egg out. You may have to break the membrane and yolk too.

how to cook an ostrich egg

how to cook an ostrich egg

Our Ostrich egg was nearly 600ml, which only equates to about 13 large eggs (45ml per large egg), which seems smaller than the average. Worth checking when you buy if it is large, small or average!

how to cook an ostrich egg

This is a giant sized mug by the way….eggy bread ready for a hungry gathering.

how to cook an ostrich egg

Have you ever cooked an ostrich egg? Fancy trying it? 

I'd love to hear what you think